New tool to extract plant aromatics and essential oils

We’ll be making soaps again but this time using the local tree and plants for their medicinal qualities.

This device goes back thousands of years.

Picture of an alembic from a medieval manuscript

By utilizing the Alembic Still, liquid can be distilled, which is heated by a flame; the “head” or “cap” (إِنْبِيق‎, ʾinbīq; Greek ἄμβιξ, ambix) which fits over the mouth of the cucurbit to receive the vapors, with an attached downward-sloping “tube” (σωλήν, sōlēn); and the “receiver” (قَابِلَة, qābila; ἄγγος, angos or φιάλη, phialē) container. In the case of another distilling vessel, the retort, the “cap” and the “cucurbit” have been combined to form a single vessel. The anbik is also called the raʾs (head) of the cucurbit. The liquid in the cucurbit is heated or boiled; the vapour rises into the anbik, where it cools by contact with the walls and condenses, running down the spout into the receiver. A modern descendant of the alembic is the pot still, used to produce distilled beverages.

We’re making Hydrosols, also known as “flower waters,” produced by distilling fresh leaves, fruits, flowers, and other plant materials. With similar properties to essential oils, these aromatic waters are much less concentrated. Their aromas are often soft and subtle when compared to their essential oil counterpart. These aromatic products usually have a scent similar to their essential oil, but also can have a greener note. This comes from the water soluble constituents in the plant material that are not present in the essential oil.

Alembic Still

Hydrosols have skin care benefits and uplifting aromatherapy properties; they make wonderful single ingredient perfumes, deodorants, facial toners, air fresheners, and aromatherapy sprays. And they are great additions to your DIY projects when blended with other flower waters, essential oils or used as a replacement for water in your favorite body care, perfume, or green cleaning recipe.

Greenhouse for seedlings 2022

Last year we bought a cheap plastic 10×15 greenhouse on Amazon, it lasted approximately 72 hours until a wind storm knocked it down. So we planted everything directly from seed , which was very late in the season, that set us back big time, but we still had a decent harvest.

This year made sure we’re going into 2022 with a sturdy Greenhouse that won’t blow over.

I did purchase pressure treated for the sill plate and pine for the roof trusses, I just didn’t have time to mill the wood for the trusses.

Used Solexx greenhouse covering, its a double walled 5mm polycarbonate for the roofing and the walls, bottom has steel roofing to protect from the insane winds and deep snow.

Roof truss templates
2 x 6’s reinforced with 3/8 plywood, glued and screwed…12 ‘ 1 “ long.
Getting the trusses in place was challenging as I did this all by myself…wore a hard hat…just in case I got clocked by one. Walls are true dimensional 2 x 4’s from the back wood lot..Tamarack…strong wood.
2 foot on center walls studs …block is filled with concrete and steel rods driven 4’ onto the ground…bolts are set into the sill plate to tie it into the foundation.
Finally

on center

Just in time for the first snow. Still need to make the doors, trim corners out and seal it up under the trusses. So far its handled 50 mph winds.